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  • Air Force Wounded Warrior Program aids Airmen, Guardians

    Life for injured or wounded military personnel can be painful as they may think there’s no treatment for what they’re going through, however, the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program helps Airmen, Guardians and families get the resources they need.

  • Kendall talks PTSD, mental health with medical leaders

    Secretary of the Air Force Frank Kendall met with Air Force Medical Service leaders to discuss the Department of the Air Force’s approach for prioritizing post-traumatic stress disorder care and support June 24.

  • PTSD: Seeking out mental health care is the first step to wellness

    Service members, family members and veterans who suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder may repeatedly re-experience their ordeal as nightmares, flashbacks or frightening thoughts, especially when exposed to events that remind them of their original trauma, according to the Centers for Disease

  • PTSD, What You Should Know

    According to the National Center for PTSD-Department of Veterans Affairs, PTSD is a mental health issue that one may develop after witnessing or experiencing a life-threatening event such as a natural disaster, combat, sexual assault, or car accident. They also specify that anyone can develop PTSD

  • PTSD Awareness Month

    Many people know of PTSD, but may not fully understand how it affects people. It can affect those suffering from it differently, and it is important to understand that PTSD is more than a diagnosis.The month of June marks Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Awareness month.

  • Helping wounded airmen recover with dignity, resolve, and resiliency

    With his personal life and military career spiraling out of control due to increased alcohol consumption, heightened self-doubt, and an amplified apathy for living, Air Force Master Sgt. (Ret.) Adam Boccher eventually exited the road to rock bottom and ruin through a program initiated to assist

  • Wounded warrior talks resiliency during tactical pause

    In the wake of Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein’s Resiliency Tactical Pause directive, Master Sgt. Jose E. Rijos, Air Force Wounded Warrior ambassador, recounted the traumas of his career with his service dog, Cairo, at his side.

  • Care beyond duty

    Airmen all over the world suffer from both visible and invisible wounds that may not always be recognized by their wingmen, and the Air Force Wounded Warrior program is available to those who need help.

  • Unresolved trauma can lead to PTSD

    It is just another routine day with the same route to work, place to eat and office conversations until it is suddenly interrupted by a sound, smell or familiar face that triggers a flood of overwhelming emotions.

  • A visible war on invisible wounds

    As the Airman speaks, the tears well up in her eyes until the weight brings them rolling down her cheeks. She can’t hold her tears back, but she won’t keep quiet; every tear is a memory and every word a liberating breath.Every sob is met with a comforting hand on the shoulder and a ‘we are with you,

  • Intrepid Spirit Center moves forward

    The 96th Medical Group held a groundbreaking ceremony to mark the construction of the Intrepid Spirit Center at Eglin Air Force Base, May 2.

  • A day that resonates

    By looking at him you wouldn’t know it, but Brewer has deep scars from a day seven years ago that took the lives of two fellow Airmen, and severely wounded two others.

  • A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD

    Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty.One of the most effective therapies, practiced by many Air Force mental health professionals, is prolonged exposure therapy.

  • A peek behind the curtain: The first step of PTSD care

    Perhaps the most difficult part of seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder is making that first appointment, since Airmen are often unsure of what to expect. Not knowing what to expect from mental health providers can get in the way of effective PTSD treatment.