Air Force Medicine

Engage

News Search

News

FILTER:
Suicide Prevention
Clear

News Comments Updated
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 54
The Air Force offers self-collection kits that include instructions, supplies to obtain a finger-prick blood sample, and a prepaid envelope to mail the sample to a lab for HIV testing. (Photo by Military Health System Communications Office) This HIV screening starts in the privacy of your own home
The Air Force has developed a self-collection blood kit to encourage its active-duty members with a higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus to test for infection more frequently than what’s mandated by the military.
0 7/05
2018
Tech. Sgt. Shanae Gallashaw, 99th Inpatient Operations Squadron critical care technician, and 1st Lt. Megan Huntley, 99th Medical Squadron pediatric nurse, practice proper first aid techniques using a tourniquet during the Stop the Bleed course at Mike O' Callaghan Military Medical Center on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, June 22, 2018. The University Medical Center of Southern Nevada and Nellis Air Force Base have partnered to teach approximately 40 Stop the Bleed instructors to educate members of the community on crisis care. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Bailee A. Darbasie) Stop the Bleed teaches crisis care
University Medical Center of Southern Nevada and Nellis Air Force Base, have partnered to teach approximately 40 Stop the Bleed instructors to educate members of the community on crisis care.
0 7/02
2018
A film crew shoots a nighttime scene at Buckley Air Force Base, Colo., Sept. 24, 2015. Members of the Center of Excellence for Medical Multimedia regularly work with film production professionals to create training and education videos for the Department of Defense. (Courtesy photo) AF organization brings filmmaking to the fight
For more than 20 years, a modest office nestled in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains has created some of the most comprehensive health education and training programs in the nation. The Center of Excellence for Medical Multimedia, or CEMM, was founded in 1996 by Dr. Kent Murphy under a simple, yet striking maxim: “Because we’re all patients.”
0 6/26
2018
Tech. Sgt. Jennifer Garrison, 28th Medical Operations Squadron noncommissioned officer in charge of the mental health clinic, separates blocks for a team building exercise with the human performance team at Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., May 9, 2018. The chapel and mental health clinic went out in human performance teams to connect with Airmen and provide information on the different ways to improve their mental resiliency. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Nicolas Z. Erwin) Breaking down the image: Mental health
Life in the military can be stressful for anyone from a pipeline Airman to a general officer. Fortunately, the 28th Medical Group Mental Health Clinic provides services for Airmen in need.
0 5/21
2018
The Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment program ensures Airmen are aware of the limitations and consequences of alcohol abuse and its impact on their Air Force career. At each installation, the ADAPT program offers awareness outreach, assessment, and counseling. (U.S. Air Force photo by Samuel King Jr.) Alcohol’s insidious nature: Getting help empowers your career
Alcohol abuse has a deceptively gradual onset that can slowly affect family, friends and work. Knowing the signs and getting help early are key to beating alcohol abuse.
0 5/16
2018
Capt. Daniel Gibson, 92nd Medical Operation Squadron psychologist, goes over the Nexxus Biotrace with Staff Sgt. Donald Durst, 92nd Aerospace Medicine Squadron aerospace medical technician, May 4, 2018 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash. The program allows patients to see how their body is responding to both physical and mental stress. The patient is able to visualize what his or her body is doing under stress and see how it differs when in a relaxed state. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Samantha Krolikowski) A day in the life: Mental health supports Airmen, readiness
As with any Air Force healthcare provider, Capt. Daniel Gibson, a clinical psychologist with the 92nd medical group, Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, relies on a collaborative, patient-centered approach to care.The mental health clinic at Fairchild Air Force Base uses a collaborative approach to ensure the best patient care.
0 5/16
2018
Default Air Force Logo Mental Health trailblazes new IOP in ACC
Moody Air Force Base’s Mental Health Flight refocused its treatment strategy, Feb. 5, by instituting a new intensive outpatient program (IOP) that gives Airmen the help they need from Airmen like themselves.
0 5/11
2018
Jamia Bailey (center) with her parents, James and Pia, after she underwent a procedure in December at Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii, to help prevent deep vein thrombosis from recurring. DVT is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep inside the body. (Courtesy photo) Deep vein thrombosis: What you need to know
Military Health System beneficiary Jamia Bailey plays three sports at Yokota High School in Fussa, Japan. She spends long hours traveling with her teammates to competitions at schools eight and even 10 hours away. When her left leg became swollen and painful one morning during class, a trip to the school nurse’s office and then to the urgent care clinic on Yokota Air Base schooled Bailey on deep vein thrombosis, or DVT.
0 4/11
2018
Maj. Shawnee Williams (second from right) stands with her team (from left) - Maj. Bryan Jackson, Dr. Daniel Mountjoy, Mr. Corey Shanahan, and Capt. Dan Neal - in the newly renovated anthropometry lab at the 711th Human Performance Wing's Human Systems Integration Directorate. (U.S. Air Force photo by Rick Eldridge) Safety perspective has allowed Human Systems Integration program to thrive
When Maj. Shawnee Williams arrived at the Human Systems Integration Directorate, part of the Air Force Research Laboratory’s 711th Human Performance Wing here, she found herself in unfamiliar territory and facing an operationally misunderstood program. So she looked at the programmatics of her division through a lens she knew: safety.
0 4/10
2018
TRICARE is changing. Are you ready? FEDVIP brings vision coverage to TRICARE beneficiaries
Only half of the 61 million U.S. adults who are at high risk for serious vision loss visited an eye doctor in the past year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Eye exams can help keep your vision strong, diagnose potential issues early, and prevent diseases that may lead to vision loss or blindness.
0 4/10
2018
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 54
RSS