Air Force Medicine

Public Affairs

Congressional and Public Affairs,
Office of the U.S Air Force
Surgeon General

(703) 681-7921

Email:
usaf.pentagon.af-sg.mbx.af-sg-public-affairs@mail.mil

Address:
7700 Arlington Blvd.,
Falls Church, VA 22042

Business Hours:
Monday - Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.

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A picture of airmen holidng his child being interviewed after returning home.

Air Force Medical Service personnel who want to share news of their accomplishments and achievements with family members and friends in their hometown can now do so online through the Army and Air Force Hometown News Release Program. Click here to get started

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The Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment program ensures Airmen are aware of the limitations and consequences of alcohol abuse and its impact on their Air Force career. At each installation, the ADAPT program offers awareness outreach, assessment, and counseling. (U.S. Air Force photo by Samuel King Jr.) Alcohol’s insidious nature: Getting help empowers your career
Alcohol abuse has a deceptively gradual onset that can slowly affect family, friends and work. Knowing the signs and getting help early are key to beating alcohol abuse.
0 5/16
2018
Capt. Daniel Gibson, 92nd Medical Operation Squadron psychologist, goes over the Nexxus Biotrace with Staff Sgt. Donald Durst, 92nd Aerospace Medicine Squadron aerospace medical technician, May 4, 2018 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash. The program allows patients to see how their body is responding to both physical and mental stress. The patient is able to visualize what his or her body is doing under stress and see how it differs when in a relaxed state. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Samantha Krolikowski) A day in the life: Mental health supports Airmen, readiness
As with any Air Force healthcare provider, Capt. Daniel Gibson, a clinical psychologist with the 92nd medical group, Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, relies on a collaborative, patient-centered approach to care.The mental health clinic at Fairchild Air Force Base uses a collaborative approach to ensure the best patient care.
0 5/16
2018
Default Air Force Logo Mental Health trailblazes new IOP in ACC
Moody Air Force Base’s Mental Health Flight refocused its treatment strategy, Feb. 5, by instituting a new intensive outpatient program (IOP) that gives Airmen the help they need from Airmen like themselves.
0 5/11
2018
Jamia Bailey (center) with her parents, James and Pia, after she underwent a procedure in December at Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii, to help prevent deep vein thrombosis from recurring. DVT is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep inside the body. (Courtesy photo) Deep vein thrombosis: What you need to know
Military Health System beneficiary Jamia Bailey plays three sports at Yokota High School in Fussa, Japan. She spends long hours traveling with her teammates to competitions at schools eight and even 10 hours away. When her left leg became swollen and painful one morning during class, a trip to the school nurse’s office and then to the urgent care clinic on Yokota Air Base schooled Bailey on deep vein thrombosis, or DVT.
0 4/11
2018
Maj. Shawnee Williams (second from right) stands with her team (from left) - Maj. Bryan Jackson, Dr. Daniel Mountjoy, Mr. Corey Shanahan, and Capt. Dan Neal - in the newly renovated anthropometry lab at the 711th Human Performance Wing's Human Systems Integration Directorate. (U.S. Air Force photo by Rick Eldridge) Safety perspective has allowed Human Systems Integration program to thrive
When Maj. Shawnee Williams arrived at the Human Systems Integration Directorate, part of the Air Force Research Laboratory’s 711th Human Performance Wing here, she found herself in unfamiliar territory and facing an operationally misunderstood program. So she looked at the programmatics of her division through a lens she knew: safety.
0 4/10
2018
TRICARE is changing. Are you ready? FEDVIP brings vision coverage to TRICARE beneficiaries
Only half of the 61 million U.S. adults who are at high risk for serious vision loss visited an eye doctor in the past year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Eye exams can help keep your vision strong, diagnose potential issues early, and prevent diseases that may lead to vision loss or blindness.
0 4/10
2018
Airmen with the 36th Medical Group Mental Health Clinic stand ready to help service members who need assistance in various life circumstances. While many service members may hold misperceptions about mental health care, clinic professionals serve to support Airmen and improve quality of life and performance through comprehensive counseling and guidance programs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexander W. Riedel/Released) Mental health team provides care with Airmen in mind
Life can be stressful.In addition to everyday life, dealing with frequent temporary duty trips, ever-lurking deployments and permanent reassignments from one end of the globe to the next can be both physically and mentally taxing for service members.Often separated from family and social support systems, Airmen encounter various stressors
0 4/02
2018
ADAPT saved my life ADAPT saved my life
Staff Sgt. Brandon was in bad shape. He drank every day and had withdrawals while at work. He looked for reasons to justify why he earned that drink at the end of the day. Brandon is a recovering alcoholic.
0 3/23
2018
A participant in the 374th Force Support Squadron Outdoor Recreation trip to Myoko-Suginohara ski resort looks over forested terrain Feb. 11, 2017, in the Niigata prefecture, Japan. Skiing and snowboarding trips from Outdoor Recreation range from one to multiple days and may include lessons from qualified skiers and snowboarders. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson) The relentless winter poses risk for head injuries
Whether skiing down slopes or walking on an icy sidewalk, winter sports and weather conditions can pose a higher risk for a traumatic brain injury. Especially with the late-winter (now early-spring) onslaught, Military Health System experts are encouraging people to be cautious of surroundings and take steps to protect themselves from these injuries that are often preventable.
0 3/22
2018
Care manager Non-medical care managers dedicated to helping wounded warriors, their caregivers and families
Non-medical care managers serve as the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program’s subject-matter experts and actively advocate for more than 3,000 wounded, ill and injured service men and women.
0 3/22
2018
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