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A film crew shoots a nighttime scene at Buckley Air Force Base, Colo., Sept. 24, 2015. Members of the Center of Excellence for Medical Multimedia regularly work with film production professionals to create training and education videos for the Department of Defense. (Courtesy photo) AF organization brings filmmaking to the fight
For more than 20 years, a modest office nestled in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains has created some of the most comprehensive health education and training programs in the nation. The Center of Excellence for Medical Multimedia, or CEMM, was founded in 1996 by Dr. Kent Murphy under a simple, yet striking maxim: “Because we’re all patients.”
0 6/26
2018
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Kathryn Dobbs, a medic from the Ohio Air National Guard’s 180th Fighter Wing, checks the prescription of an optometry patient’s eyeglasses at a health-care clinic being operated by the Air Guard and U.S. Navy Reserve at Breathitt County High School in Jackson, Ky., June 20, 2018. The Jackson clinic is one of four that comprised Operation Bobcat, a 10-day mission to provide military medical troops with crucial training in field operations and logistics while offering no-cost health care to the residents of Eastern Kentucky. The clinics, which operated from June 15-24, offered non-emergent medical care; sports physicals; dental cleanings, fillings and extractions; eye exams and no-cost prescription eye glasses. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Lt. Col. Dale Greer) Operation Bobcat provides 13,000 hours of training for troops, $1 million in healthcare to residents of Eastern Kentucky
Marita Moore came bearing gifts. The Beattyville resident arrived here at Lee County High School on Wednesday with trays full of homemade cookies, brownies and fudge. It was her way of saying “thank you” to the Air National Guardsmen and U.S. Navy reservists who set up healthcare clinics in four Eastern Kentucky communities this month to train while serving local residents with no-cost medicine, dentistry and eyeglasses.
0 6/26
2018
Many Airman are unaware what the initial meeting with a mental health provider looks like when they seek PTSD treatment. The goal of the first meeting is to make the patient feel comfortable and to be as transparent as possible about what is going on and what treatment options the patient has. As a result, the patient and mental health provider will more likely have a collaborative and trusting interaction, making PTSD treatment more successful. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Josh Mahler) A peek behind the curtain: The first step of PTSD care
Perhaps the most difficult part of seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder is making that first appointment, since Airmen are often unsure of what to expect. Not knowing what to expect from mental health providers can get in the way of effective PTSD treatment.
0 6/26
2018
June is Men’s Health Month and a perfect time to highlight an important and overlooked issue. (U.S. Air Force photo) Silent sufferers: Acknowledging male victims of domestic violence
June is Men’s Health Month and a perfect time to highlight an important and overlooked issue. There is a general assumption that women are always the victims in an abusive relationship. Even in our progressive society, we continue to marginalize, isolate, and disbelieve the existence of domestic violence against men.
0 6/26
2018
Members of the 161st Air Refueling Wing process a patient through an In-Place Patient Decontamination station during an exercise at the Goldwater Air National Guard Base, May 22, 2018. The purpose of the exercise was to train and evaluate the IPPD team's ability to decontaminate and prepare a patient to be transported onto a higher level of medical care. (U.S. National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Wes Parrell) AZ Guard Airmen train to operate patient decontamination station
A community’s ability to cope with a mass casualty event depends on the capabilities of its first responders and public health professionals to handle a sudden surge in demand of patients with resource-intensive and specialized medical needs. For the members of the 161st Air Refueling Wing’s Medical Group, their ability to respond and support an impacted community is a responsibility they do not take lightly.
0 6/25
2018
A U.S. Air Force 353rd Special Operations Squadron member responds to a simulated casualty during a medical exercise, June 6, 2018, at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan. The Air Force performs joint medical exercises with other U.S. forces regularly in Okinawa to better prepare service members for real world emergencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Thomas Barley) Joint training keeps Air Force medics ready to use varied platforms
When medical Airmen deploy to the battlefield or humanitarian missions, they are often side-by-side with elements from other U.S. service branches. Many of these units use different platforms to deliver medical care and transport patients.
0 6/22
2018
Airmen required to take opioid medication should familiarize themselves with proper usage procedures and understand the associated risks to their health and readiness. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Senior Airman Kristin High) Don’t put yourself at risk for drug misuse, talk to your doctor
When Airmen have a prescription for an opioid pain medication, they need to closely follow their doctor’s orders, for the good of their health and their careers.
0 6/21
2018
U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Juliet Corcillo, 81st Medical Operations Squadron Emergency Department NCO in charge, poses for a photo in front of an ambulance outside of the Keesler Medical Center at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, June 14, 2018. Corcillo was awarded a full ride scholarship to medical school from the Air Force’s Health Professions Scholarship Program. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue) Airman pursues dream to become doctor, earns full scholarship
An 81st Medical Operations Squadron Airman is pursuing her dream of becoming a physician and was recently awarded a full ride scholarship to medical school. Tech. Sgt. Juliet Corcillo, 81st MDOS Emergency Department NCO in charge, will begin her first day of medical school July 6 with a four-year scholarship from the Air Force’s Health Professions Scholarship Program.
0 6/21
2018
Danna Plewe, center, meets with Gen. Ellen Pawlikowski, the commander of Air Force Materiel Command, and from left, Jennifer Treat, Patricia Young, AFMC executive director, and David Taylor, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, April 16, 2018.  The group met with Pawlikowski to discuss the Air Force Employee Assistance Program, which is a civilian employee benefit designed to help members and their families manage daily responsibilities and life events.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Scott M. Ash) Employee Assistance Program: One-stop resource for support
The Air Force’s new Employee Assistance Program provides civilian employees and their families with free, confidential resources and support to help manage normal everyday life challenges that may affect job performance and personal well-being.
0 6/20
2018
Those that suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are consistently trying to regain some sense of the normalcy they had before events that caused pieces of themselves to go missing. Misconceptions and stigmas surrounding PTSD get in the way of successful recovery and the ability to return to duty. (U.S. Air Force illustration by Master Sgt. William Vance) A peek behind the curtain: PTSD barriers and stigmas
Effective treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder is possible, but many Airmen falsely think seeking medical help for PTSD will hurt their career and will not help them get better. These stigmas and misconceptions create perceived barriers, preventing Airmen from seeking care. Delaying treatment can cause the anxiety and fear following a traumatic event to affect an Airman’s readiness.
0 6/20
2018
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