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  • Air Force, Army medevacs 30 patients

    Chaos ensues on the flight line as 30 battered and bruised patients ail from injuries suffered during simulated wartime contingencies. Responsible for rapidly responding and stabilizing the situation, a special crew of U.S. Air Force and Army medical professionals rush to the scene with one objective: to safely care and transport Army soldiers onto a C-130J Super Hercules en route to a medical treatment facility at Yokoto Air Base. Utilizing Osan Air Base’s flight line for its patient staging capabilities, the 51st Medical Group and Fort Shafter, Hawaii’s 18th Medical Command jointly operated in Operation Ascending Eagle, Aug. 28, with their mission to enhance their rapid treatment of traumatized patients in a large casualty emergency.
  • An AFMS look back: Air Force provides medical, humanitarian support after hurricane devastation

    The hurricanes that battered dozens of islands in the Caribbean and the southeast U.S. in 2017 left millions without power, food, safe drinking water and medical support. In the wake of the devastation, disaster relief efforts mobilized, with Air Force assets providing aeromedical evacuation, logistics support and medics from several military treatment facilities.
  • AF keeps a pulse on advancing en route patient monitoring

    Researchers with the 711th Human Performance Wing at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, are evaluating prototype noise-immune stethoscope technologies to assess their ability to function in dynamic high-noise environments on aircraft.
  • Lighter, leaner, lifesaving: AF tests wearable medical tech

    Wearable medical technology is helping the Air Force bring advanced deployed medical capabilities further forward on the battlefield. Researchers from the 711th Human Performance Wing at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, are advancing wearable medical technology to offer new types of care in deployed environments, and improving care downrange and during medical evacuations.
  • This Month in AFMS History: The air transportable “Flying Lung”

    On July 23, 1953, Airman Third Class Warren Beatty of Detroit, Michigan, became the first iron lung patient evacuated by air from the Korean War theater.
  • AF tests en route wound care device

    Air Force Medical Evaluation and Support Activity engineers and medics successfully tested a new multi-channel wound vacuum system, a device that would improve aeromedical evacuation crews’ capability to deliver life-saving en route wound care. AFMESA routinely performs operational testing of medical devices. When delivering critical care in the air, devices have to work and there is no room for error.
  • Care in the air: Teams deliver patient care in challenging environments

    The back of an aircraft is a challenging place to deliver medical care. For Air Force medical crews, treating patients in the air is just part of the job.
  • The “Cadillac of medevac”: The C9A’s lasting mark on the aeromedical evacuation system

    Making its debut in August of 1968, the C-9A was the U.S. Air Force’s first specially designed aeromedical evacuation aircraft. The C-9A answered the increased demand for effective aeromedical patient transport as U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War escalated.
  • Air Force researchers test deployable oxygen generation

    Air Force medics delivering trauma care in austere environments face many challenges. One dilemma Air Force researchers are working to overcome is the need for a mobile, effective, and safe way to supply medical oxygen to treat patients with severely damaged lung function closer to the point of injury.
  • Air Force provides aeromedical evacuation to dialysis patients trapped by hurricanes

    The hurricanes that battered dozens of islands in the Caribbean and the southeast U.S. in the last month left millions without power, food, safe drinking water and no way to contact the outside world. The situation is devastating for everyone in the area, but for people undergoing dialysis, it is especially dangerous. Air Force medical assets have provided aeromedical evacuation to more than 100 patients at dialysis clinics damaged or left without power from the storms.
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