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  • Operation Allied Force and Shining Hope: The making of the new expeditionary AFMS

    This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Air Force Medical Service’s involvement in Operation Allied Force and the humanitarian support in Operation Shining Hope, and the first deployment of the Air Force’s Expeditionary Medical Support System, or EMEDS.
  • First Chief of the Nurse Corps

    Verena M. Zeller, the first chief of the Air Force Nurse Corps, was promoted to lieutenant colonel in April 1950. Zeller led the Nurse Corps during the Korean War, overseeing its growth and evolution into an organization focused on flight care.
  • ANZAC Day: A time for honoring partnerships

    Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) Day is a time to honor members and reflect on the long-lasting partnership between ANZAC and the Air Force Medical Service, which reaches back to the Korean war when ANZAC and AFMS members worked together as allies. Pictured above, Australian flight nurse Nathalie Oldham, on temporary duty with the U.S.
  • The evolution of aeromedical evacuation capabilities help deployed medicine take flight

    Evacuating patients injured in combat and transporting them to higher levels of care requires a team of trained medics with the capability to keep patients stable in-flight. The Air Force’s Aeromedical Evacuation system has been a staple of transporting wartime casualties since World War II.
  • The “Cadillac of medevac”: The C9A’s lasting mark on the aeromedical evacuation system

    Making its debut in August of 1968, the C-9A was the U.S. Air Force’s first specially designed aeromedical evacuation aircraft. The C-9A answered the increased demand for effective aeromedical patient transport as U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War escalated.
  • Air Force Medicine during the Vietnam War

    By the height of the Vietnam War in the late 1960’s, the U.S. Air Force had 1,900 medics conducting medical operations in Southeast Asia. The steady aeromedical evacuation and in-theater care performed by the Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) in Southeast Asia drove innovation and evolution in flight medicine and aeromedical evacuation.
  • Air Force Medicine in the Korean War

    The Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) became independent from the U.S. Army in 1949, just four years after the end of World War II. The Korean War, just a year later, was the first opportunity for the new medical arm of the U.S. Air Force to demonstrate its value in a wartime situation. Many of the lessons learned and process developed in that conflict are still vital to the AFMS mission today.
  • This Month in AFMS History: Malcolm Grow and the 1934 Alaskan Flight

    Before Maj. Gen. (Dr.) Malcolm C. Grow became the first surgeon general of the U.S. Air Force, he was already well-known for his medical activities.  Grow was a recognized leader in creating unique equipment, such as armored vests and electric gloves, to help the flyers during World War II.  He was most influential in the establishment of an
  • Creation of the first Central Medical Establishment in World War II

    In the early days of World War II, Eighth Air Force Surgeon, Col. Malcolm C. Grow, grew concerned about the mental and physical well-being of aircrews within the command. To address these concerns, he first created a ‘Care of the Flyer’ section on his staff. Shortly thereafter, with the help of Col. Harry G. Armstrong, Grow stood up a medical research, development, and training facility in Great Britain to study additional ways to keep flyers in the air, eventually called the first Central Medical Establishment.
  • First Flight Nurse of the Year Award

    On May 5, 1968, the Aerospace Medical Association established the “Flight Nurse of the Year award.  The first recipient, Maj. Virginia M. Alena, received a trophy, a wrist watch, and a $500 honorarium from the sponsor of the award, Douglas Aircraft Company. She was recognized for her work as the task scientist on a project to improve patient care
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