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  • “I wanted my life back” – An Airman’s recovery after a mysterious diagnosis

    A mysterious pain in Chief Master Sgt. Chad Caden’s right foot led to years of pain, uncertainty, and a life-changing decision that proved to be the best one he ever made. Caden’s recovery and return to active duty reinforces the Air Force Medical Service’s commitment to its Airmen and patient-centered care.
  • Living with an attitude of gratitude – An Airman’s story of resiliency (Part 3)

    “I already got my running blade,” said an enthusiastic Maj. Stephanie Proellochs (PRE’-locks). After only taking her first steps in November, Proellochs, a U.S. Air Force Medical Service Corps (MSC) Officer and recent amputee, was already thinking of how she would be able to run and eventually snowboard with her family.
  • Embracing the uncharted life as an amputee – An Airman’s story of resiliency (Part 2)

    Maj. Stephanie Proellochs (PRE’-locks), a recent amputee, gazes up at the rock climbing wall at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center’s physical therapy center in Bethesda, Maryland. She recalled the time she witnessed a Service member who had lost his arm effortlessly climb his way to the top.
  • Every journey begins with a single step – An Airman’s story of resiliency (Part 1)

    This started as a story about an Airman fighting cancer, overcoming the odds, and returning to active duty. Unfortunately, stories about cancer are rarely so simple, and just when the finish line is in site, new challenges can present themselves. Such is the case for Maj. Stephanie Proellochs, a Medical Service Corps (MSC) officer, who after a year of treatment and the amputation of her left foot, thought she was cancer-free in November.
  • We really do have the technology: 3-D printing takes wounded warriors to a new dimension

    One wounded warrior wanted to amble around the hotel pool during his honeymoon without strapping on prosthetic legs. Another wanted ice skates to fit snugly onto his prosthetic feet so he’d receive the sensory feedback he’d come to expect when engaging in his favorite pastime. And yet another wanted to hold a fishing rod while enjoying full use of the hook where his hand used to be.
  • Joint Pathology Center to celebrate 100 years of helping military docs confirm diagnoses

    As a young pathologist 40 years ago, Dr. Isabell Sesterhenn helped doctors diagnose disease. She was essentially “the lab” you hear about where a biopsy or tissue sample is studied to determine what the disease might be. But back then, the information she had within arm’s reach was limited.
  • Healing from invisible wounds: The other side of the story

    Chanda D’Angelo was in a frenzy; she quickly washed all the clothes in her home, zoomed the vacuum across every floor, wiped down every surface, cleaned out the refrigerator and stove and scrubbed the windows and mirrors until they were spotless. Exhausted, she had just enough time to get her hair and nails done – everything had to be perfect for her husband’s return.
  • Healing from invisible wounds

    On Jan. 15, 2008, Senior Airman Christopher D’Angelo, a heavy equipment operator, was the lead gunner in an armored vehicle convoy on a road near Baghdad. The sun was shining and the air comfortable. His unit had just transported construction materials to forward operating bases and was currently scouting an area to see how they might transport heavy equipment.
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