• AFW2 provides care, advocacy for AFGSC Airmen

    Among those who deployed, more than 52,000 U.S. service members were physically injured in recent military conflicts, and another 500,000 are living with invisible wounds ranging from depression to post-traumatic stress disorder.

  • The Initial Perception

    There are many common sayings that go along with how important the first impression you leave on someone is. No matter the circumstances for someone’s behavior, on any particular day, there is no way to reverse that initial interaction, conversation, attitude, etc. For this reason, and many more,

  • Wounded warriors share message of resilience in Florida

    On the day a bullet tore through his legs inside an HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter, U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. August O’Niell, 414th Combat Training Squadron Detachment 1 flight chief in charge of ground operations at Davis-Monthan, Air Force Base, Arizona, said his world changed.

  • Wounded warrior talks resiliency during tactical pause

    In the wake of Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein’s Resiliency Tactical Pause directive, Master Sgt. Jose E. Rijos, Air Force Wounded Warrior ambassador, recounted the traumas of his career with his service dog, Cairo, at his side.

  • Resiliency as part of the healing process

    The Air Force Wounded Warrior Program (AFW2) kicked off its Northeast Region Warrior CARE Event at the National Harbor this morning, starting the week with a day of resiliency programs featuring music, yoga, journaling and improvisational comedy workshops.

  • 59 MDW expands wounded warrior care at MacDill AFB

    MacDill Air Force Base’s 6th Medical Wing’s dermatology clinic partnered with members from the 59th MDW to learn fractional laser resurfacing, a treatment used by the 59th MDW since 2007, providing patient-centered care to wounded warriors with traumatic amputations, burns and severe scarring.

  • Invisible wounds: Finding a voice

    Air Force leadership and wounded warriors came together to speak out on invisible wounds during a panel discussion at this year’s Air Force Association Air, Space and Cyber Conference, Sept. 18, 2017.

  • Caregivers play critical role in lives of wounded warriors

    Tech. Sgt. Eric Fisher was two months into a five-month deployment in 2011 to Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan, when he suffered a heart attack after an intense rocket attack, and a day of moving heavy pallets on the flight line.

  • Healing from invisible wounds

    On Jan. 15, 2008, Senior Airman Christopher D’Angelo, a heavy equipment operator, was the lead gunner in an armored vehicle convoy on a road near Baghdad. The sun was shining and the air comfortable. His unit had just transported construction materials to forward operating bases and was currently

  • Airman seeks to rejoin pararescue team despite loss of leg

    In July 2011, Staff Sgt. August O’Neill, a pararescueman, was sent to rescue a group of Marines pinned down in Afghanistan when enemy insurgents opened fire on his team’s helicopter. A round bounced off the helicopter’s door, tearing through both of O’Neill’s lower legs and critically wounding his

  • Wounded Warrior Program goes beyond medical needs to provide support

    The Air Force Medical Service provides medical care for Airmen, but sometimes they need  more than healthcare to be whole again. The Air Force’s Wounded Warrior Program leaves medical care to the AFMS and provides an entirely different, but still essential, kind of support to seriously wounded or

  • Army green inspires Air Force blue: Reservists help wounded warrior

    Crew chiefs from the 459th Air Refueling Wing’s 459th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron wore matching Patriots Honor shirts as they spent their Saturday, Feb. 27, unpacking tools, building tables and outfitting a home garage in Annapolis, Maryland, for retired Army Sgt. Adam Keys, a wounded Operation

  • Wheelchair rugby makes debut for Warrior CARE Month

    Fifty-pound wheeled chariots made of steel, aluminum and over-sized wheels were the modes of battle Nov. 16 as teams of joint-service wounded, ill and injured kicked off a demonstration of wheelchair rugby.