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  • Care in the Air

    Dangers are always present in today’s world. Whether it is a category 5 hurricane hitting the East Coast leveling everything in its path or an intense fire fight in the heartland of Afghanistan, every day could be someone’s last. However, there is a squadron always ready at a moment’s notice to do whatever it takes to bring someone. The 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron is one of four active duty AE units in the Air Force comprised of 122 members. Units like the 375th AES are the ones who transport the wounded from the frontlines to higher-stage medical facilities while providing life-saving care at 30,000 feet in the air.
  • Air Force, industry consortium advancing tech for aeromedical evacuation

    Through an industry-academia partnership and a recently-released request for proposals, the Air Force Research Laboratory is looking to advance human-monitoring research and development for the future warfighter. The request for proposals, announced May 6, 2019, targets projects designed to accelerate innovations in health monitoring, diagnostics, and performance augmentation. Specifically, topics of interest include wearable human-monitoring capabilities. The effort is being managed in a partnership between AFRL and SEMI, a global industry association of manufacturing companies.
  • Fairchild, Kadena AB partner for aeromedical evacuation exercise

    A Team Fairchild 384th Air Refueling Squadron tanker and aircrew partnered with Kadena Air Base 18th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron medics to execute an aeromedical evacuation exercise Feb. 19, at Kadena AB, Japan.
  • C-17 Globemaster III: An aircraft as versatile as AE crews

    Larger, faster and flexible – a flying ICU. Since joining the U.S. Air Force fleet in 1993, the C-17 Globemaster III has significantly expanded aeromedical evacuation capabilities. In addition to its transport and other numerous mission sets, the C-17 converts to provide aeromedical evacuation to patients in a broad variety of conditions. The aircraft has played critical roles in various contingencies, bringing warfighters to higher levels of care, bringing patients home to the U.S., and aiding in humanitarian efforts to save the lives of those impacted by natural disasters.
  • From Just Cause to Iraqi Freedom: Nurse recounts time through three wars

    U.S. Air Force Capt. Carol Vermillion felt no fear while flying to Panama in December 1989 as part of Operation Just Cause, the first of three conflicts where she served as a nurse. “I was more excited and anxious,” recalled Vermillion, who retired as a colonel. “I felt more a part of the Air Force.”
  • Super Galaxy: AE’s biggest ally

    During a cold, gloomy first week of December, total force Airmen teamed up at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, to test the capability of the Air Forces largest aircraft to perform aeromedical evacuation during a proof of concept event. The goal was to establish the C-5M Super Galaxy as part of the universal qualification training program for AE forces. If successfully certified, the C-5M will have the capability to move three times the current capacity in one mission compared to other AE platforms.
  • Steady and ready: C-130 mainstay of medevac

    Since the Vietnam War, the C-130 Hercules has been a workhorse of aeromedical evacuation, and continues to serve as a reliable platform to move patients over long distances, allowing Airmen to provide critical care in the air, aid in disaster relief efforts, and bring warfighters home.
  • Exercise Ultimate Caduceus

    Exercise Ultimate Caduceus is an annual patient movement exercise designed to test the ability of U.S. Transportation Command to provide medical evacuation.
  • An AFMS look back: Air Force provides medical, humanitarian support after hurricane devastation

    The hurricanes that battered dozens of islands in the Caribbean and the southeast U.S. in 2017 left millions without power, food, safe drinking water and medical support. In the wake of the devastation, disaster relief efforts mobilized, with Air Force assets providing aeromedical evacuation, logistics support and medics from several military treatment facilities.
  • 105th AW Airmen see impact of aeromedical evacuation mission

    It was supposed to be a five-minute helicopter ride from Kabul International Airport, where Col. Laurel “Buff” Burkel was stationed, to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization headquarters.
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