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  • Department of the Air Force remains focused on suicide prevention

    In 2019, the Department of the Air Force suicide count and rate were the highest in recent history.
  • Understanding Depression

    The National Institute for Mental Health defines depression as a common but serious mood disorder that negatively affects how you feel, think, and handle daily activities such as sleeping, eating, and working.
  • Air Force psychologist considers social media’s role in suicide prevention

    Social media connects us to more people than ever before, but these contacts may not be the type that help build resiliency. Strong interpersonal connections play a critical role in suicide prevention. Used correctly, social media can be an important tool in the suicide prevention toolbox for commanders, friends, and family.
  • Be there, be aware: Help prevent suicide

    When we focus on our health, it’s easy to pay attention to physical health versus mental well-being. Ignoring mental health concerns like anxiety and depression can lead to worsening symptoms and more serious issues. For some people, these issues may include an increased risk of suicide.
  • Seeking help does not end military career

    Throughout September, the nation is observing Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. Since 2012, the estimated rate of death by suicide across the Department of Defense has remained about the same per 100,000 people – 20 for active duty members, 24 for reservists and 27 for guard members. The Air Force rate also is estimated at 20 per 100,000 members, according to the DOD Suicide Event Report.
  • The Airman’s guide to suicide prevention

    While Suicide Prevention Month is observed across the U.S. in September, all Airmen have a duty to be true Wingmen to their peers 24/7, 365 days a year. It includes getting to know our fellow Airmen, from the newest shop mate to the most senior one. It means being aware of what is going on in their lives, supporting them through difficult times, recognizing the signs of suicidal thoughts and taking action.
  • Suicide Prevention Month raises awareness, promotes understanding

    Throughout September, organizations across the United States make efforts to raise awareness of a mental health issue affecting many demographics.
  • The question that matters most

    It was about one in the morning when Jim Cunningham found out his eldest brother committed suicide.
  • I lost my son: Airman turns tragedy into therapy through resilience

    Following the unexpected death of her youngest son, Jeremiah, she became reckless. She was drinking daily and didn’t care whether she lived or died. It took a failed suicide attempt and court-ordered therapy for her life to change.
  • Chaplain survives aftermath of son’s suicide; spreads awareness

    While enjoying a drive through the rolling Tennessee countryside with his wife, the shrill ring of his cell phone pierced through the tranquility of the moment. Maj. William D. Logan's daughter, Blair, managed to utter, "Zac has done something really bad."
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