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  • Air Force bioenvironmental engineers expand mission in aerovac, workspaces

    Bioenvironmental engineers across the Air Force are working to keep the workplace safe during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Charleston mobilizes Aeromedical Evacuation Airmen for COVID-19 response

    Approximately 10 Reserve Airmen from the 315th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron were mobilized this week in support of COVID-19 relief efforts. The Citizen Airmen will participate in the COVID-19 Aeromedical Evacuation hub that has been established at Joint Base Charleston and will deploy around the globe as needed.
  • AMC Airmen conduct historic first aeromedical evacuation mission using Transport Isolation System

    The aeromedical evacuation mission, REACH 725, marked the first operational use of the TIS since its development during the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, and the first movement of COVID-19 positive patients aboard U.S. Air Force aircraft.
  • Twin newborns medically evacuated from Korea land at Joint Base Andrews to receive care at Walter Reed

    Twin newborns medically evacuated from Osan Air Base, South Korea, landed at Joint Base Andrews in a C-17 Globemaster III this evening. The pair were then transported to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for advanced neonatal care.
  • USAF medics maintain proficiency through practice, persistence & partnerships

    The Air Force accomplished an unprecedented mission in August 2019 when medics from across the force came together for an 8,000 mile, non-stop evacuation of a critically injured Soldier. With a C-17 Globemaster III crew and refueling aircraft positioned along the way, 18 medics, including a Critical Care Air Transport Team, moved the patient direct from Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, to Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas. At every stage and under strenuous conditions, Airmen delivered exceptional care to save a life. While the length of this mission was challenging and unprecedented, this is the type of mission the Air Force prepares to execute every day, delivering ready medical support to operational forces. Air Force medics stay ready to answer that call and “fight tonight” by maintaining clinical currency and proficiency through treating patients and readiness training.
  • Fairchild KC-135 supports aeromedical evacuation training at Travis

    Team Fairchild provided KC-135 Stratotanker support during aeromedical evacuation training for the 43rd Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron at Travis Air Force Base, Feb. 10-11. Training consisted of familiarization of the KC-135 airframe for emergency evacuation procedures, simulated in-flight medical emergencies, aircraft emergency simulations and medical equipment for both Fairchild and Travis Airmen in order to qualify for semi-annual requirements.
  • U.S. Transportation Command manages the movement of America’s wounded warfighters from overseas to the final medical treatment destination stateside

    U.S. military C-17 Globemaster III aircraft often arrive at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, and Travis Air Force Base, California, from foreign locales, transporting cargo, but also at times, ill or injured service members returning stateside for continuing medical treatment. As the Department of Defense’s single manager for global patient movement, U.S. Transportation Command conducts this lifesaving mission via the U.S. Air Force’s aeromedical evacuation system, which provides in-transit health care for America’s wounded warriors from the point of injury or illness to medical facilities with the level of care needed to properly treat their medical conditions.
  • Aeromedical Evacuation knows no bounds

    “At any time during normal operations, Air Mobility Command can be called upon to support humanitarian and contingency operations around the world,” said Lt. Col. Michael Earl, 43rd Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron Detachment 1 director of operations at Travis AFB. “Training is how we respond with such effectiveness that the U.S. is known as the world’s first responders.”
  • Guard and Reserve crucial to CCATT expansion

    CCATTs augment aeromedical evacuation crews that turn the back of an aircraft of opportunity into a flying intensive care unit. Made up of a three-person medical team, CCATTs provide advanced care, transporting severely injured or ill patients to higher levels of care. The Air Force is increasing the number of Critical Care Air Transport Teams to support future readiness requirements.
  • Japanese Surgeon General visits Travis

    All the bells and whistles of the U.S. west coast mobility mission were on full display during a visit from Japanese Maj. Gen. Shinya Bekku, Japanese Air Self-Defense Force Surgeon General, Dec. 9, 2019, at Travis Air Force Base, California.
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