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Air Force Surgeon General briefs Congress on value of military medicine

Lt. Gen. Dorothy Hogg, U.S. Air Force Surgeon General (U.S. Air Force photo)

Lt. Gen. Dorothy Hogg, U.S. Air Force Surgeon General (U.S. Air Force photo)

WASHINGTON D.C. -- Lt. Gen. Dorothy Hogg, the U.S. Air Force Surgeon General, testified Thursday, March 5, before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense at a hearing on Defense Health Program funding.

Hogg’s testimony focused on the value of the Military Health System, and the unique capabilities the Air Force Medical Service delivers to U.S. forces.

“At home and abroad, Air Force medics answer the call across a broad spectrum of operational, humanitarian, and disaster response missions,” said Hogg. “From the clinic to the battlefield and the back of an airplane, our ability to deliver life-sustaining care in the most challenging environments ensures that our warriors return home to their families.”

The Air Force has completed more than 340,000 global patient global patient movements since September 11, 2001, as part of its aeromedical evacuation mission. Air Force medics receive specialized training to deliver in-flight care.

Hogg highlighted the Air Force’s partnerships with government and civilian health organizations as critical to maintaining all the skills Air Force medics need to stay current and complete their mission. She also emphasized the diversity of care that goes into ensuring medical readiness while deployed.

“In the deployed environment, roughly 30 percent of downrange is trauma related,” said Hogg. “The remaining 70 percent is disease and non-battle injuries. These injuries range from occupational, dental, and musculoskeletal issues. Our training and currency opportunities mirror these scenarios to produce well-rounded, flexible medics who can accomplish any mission under the most unpredictable conditions.”

View the hearing in its entirety at the House Appropriation Committee website.

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