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  • The Airman’s guide to suicide prevention

    While Suicide Prevention Month is observed across the U.S. in September, all Airmen have a duty to be true Wingmen to their peers 24/7, 365 days a year. It includes getting to know our fellow Airmen, from the newest shop mate to the most senior one. It means being aware of what is going on in their lives, supporting them through difficult times, recognizing the signs of suicidal thoughts and taking action.
  • Suicide Prevention Month raises awareness, promotes understanding

    Throughout September, organizations across the United States make efforts to raise awareness of a mental health issue affecting many demographics.
  • The question that matters most

    It was about one in the morning when Jim Cunningham found out his eldest brother committed suicide.
  • Airman overcomes suicidal thoughts, strives to help others

    Being part of the Air Force is not an easy task. Airmen are charged with supporting and defending the U.S. from all enemies, foreign and domestic. As a result, the military life has many stressors and responsibilities. Deployments, financial strains, intensive training, long work days and adapting to new austere environments are a few examples of the hardships some Airmen face.
  • Resources and resiliency help children of military parents turn away from suicidal thoughts

    Like many teenagers starting high school, Edward was having trouble fitting in. The child of military parents who traveled around the world, Edward, whose name has been changed to protect his privacy, found himself in a new, civilian school where he was one of few “military brats.” He was admittedly a bit out of shape, nerdy, and found it hard to make friends.
  • Airmen helping Airmen: Suicide prevention

    Charged with the safety of every American against all enemies, both foreign and domestic, military members are expected to perform in highly stressful environments. Airmen deal with everyday stressors that come with wearing the uniform, and issues that arise both on and off the battlefield.These challenges eventually become too much for some to bear. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, 22 Veterans commit suicide every day and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 40,000 people commit suicide every year in the U.S. alone.
  • Eliminate the risk of secondhand smoke to your family

    You don’t have to be a routine smoker to feel the harmful health effects that cigarette smoke produces. Keeping the windows open in the car or house doesn’t eliminate the risk, either.
  • Suicide prevention month: stopping suicide is everyone’s battle

    September is Suicide Prevention Month, a time for Americans to build awareness and help understand suicide in our culture. More than 40,000 Americans lose their life due to suicide each year and research shows that rates in the military and the general population are very close. The loss of any one person to suicide is a tragedy, and that is why
  • Creation of the first Central Medical Establishment in World War II

    In the early days of World War II, Eighth Air Force Surgeon, Col. Malcolm C. Grow, grew concerned about the mental and physical well-being of aircrews within the command. To address these concerns, he first created a ‘Care of the Flyer’ section on his staff. Shortly thereafter, with the help of Col. Harry G. Armstrong, Grow stood up a medical research, development, and training facility in Great Britain to study additional ways to keep flyers in the air, eventually called the first Central Medical Establishment.
  • Gastroenterology clinic helps prevent colon cancer with early detection screenings

    WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio – The 88th Medical Group gastroenterology clinic treats and provides screenings for a broad range of diseases of the digestive system.  Services provided at the clinic are colon cancer screenings and prevention. Other procedures also conducted are esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGD) to examine the esophagus and
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