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  • Deep vein thrombosis: What you need to know

    Military Health System beneficiary Jamia Bailey plays three sports at Yokota High School in Fussa, Japan. She spends long hours traveling with her teammates to competitions at schools eight and even 10 hours away. When her left leg became swollen and painful one morning during class, a trip to the school nurse’s office and then to the urgent care clinic on Yokota Air Base schooled Bailey on deep vein thrombosis, or DVT.
  • Safety perspective has allowed Human Systems Integration program to thrive

    When Maj. Shawnee Williams arrived at the Human Systems Integration Directorate, part of the Air Force Research Laboratory’s 711th Human Performance Wing here, she found herself in unfamiliar territory and facing an operationally misunderstood program. So she looked at the programmatics of her division through a lens she knew: safety.
  • FEDVIP brings vision coverage to TRICARE beneficiaries

    Only half of the 61 million U.S. adults who are at high risk for serious vision loss visited an eye doctor in the past year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Eye exams can help keep your vision strong, diagnose potential issues early, and prevent diseases that may lead to vision loss or blindness.
  • Mental health team provides care with Airmen in mind

    Life can be stressful.In addition to everyday life, dealing with frequent temporary duty trips, ever-lurking deployments and permanent reassignments from one end of the globe to the next can be both physically and mentally taxing for service members.Often separated from family and social support systems, Airmen encounter various stressors
  • ADAPT saved my life

    Staff Sgt. Brandon was in bad shape. He drank every day and had withdrawals while at work. He looked for reasons to justify why he earned that drink at the end of the day. Brandon is a recovering alcoholic.
  • The relentless winter poses risk for head injuries

    Whether skiing down slopes or walking on an icy sidewalk, winter sports and weather conditions can pose a higher risk for a traumatic brain injury. Especially with the late-winter (now early-spring) onslaught, Military Health System experts are encouraging people to be cautious of surroundings and take steps to protect themselves from these injuries that are often preventable.
  • Non-medical care managers dedicated to helping wounded warriors, their caregivers and families

    Non-medical care managers serve as the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program’s subject-matter experts and actively advocate for more than 3,000 wounded, ill and injured service men and women.
  • The dangers of opioid pain medications

    Pain is the most common reason people seek medical treatment. According to the National Institutes of Health, more than 1 in 10 Americans have chronic pain or pain every day for the preceding three months.
  • Physical therapist strengthens EOD mission readiness

    Every job in the U.S. Air Force plays a specific role in making sure the mission is accomplished, but for some Airmen, their career fields can physically demand more from their bodies.
  • Clinic answers call for invisible wound care

    In the midst of brain injury awareness month, construction of a facility to treat traumatic brain injury is well underway at the 96th Medical Group.
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