HomeNewsDisplay

David Grant Medical Center tests advanced cancer treatment

U.S. Air Force doctors prepare a high dose of Yttrium-90 radioactive beads during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radio-embolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force doctors prepare a high dose of Yttrium-90 radioactive beads during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radio-embolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Justin Ritzel, 60th Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron, prepares a tray of specialized medical equipment ahead of an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure for a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Josh Mahler)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Justin Ritzel, 60th Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron, prepares a tray of specialized medical equipment ahead of an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure for a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Josh Mahler)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Christopher Moore, 60th Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron, prepares a tray of specialized medical equipment ahead of an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure for a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Christopher Moore, 60th Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron, prepares a tray of specialized medical equipment ahead of an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure for a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) David Gover and Maj. (Dr.) Jason Hoskins, 60th Medical Group interventional radiologists at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center conduct an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure for a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) David Gover and Maj. (Dr.) Jason Hoskins, 60th Medical Group interventional radiologists at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center conduct an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure for a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) David Gover and Maj. (Dr.) Jason Hoskins, 60th Medical Group interventional radiologists at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center conduct an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure on a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (Photo altered for security reasons) (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) David Gover and Maj. (Dr.) Jason Hoskins, 60th Medical Group interventional radiologists at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center conduct an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure on a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (Photo altered for security reasons) (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force doctors prepare a high dose of Yttrium-90 radioactive beads during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force doctors prepare a high dose of Yttrium-90 radioactive beads during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

Devices designed to detect radioactive material were used during an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure to ensure the safety for medical personnel during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

Devices designed to detect radioactive material were used during an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure to ensure the safety for medical personnel during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

Devices designed to detect radioactive material were used during an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure to ensure the safety for medical personnel during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

Devices designed to detect radioactive material were used during an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure to ensure the safety for medical personnel during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Keith Moore, 60th Medical Group, uses a device designed to detect radioactive material to scan Maj. (Dr.) Jason Hoskins, 60th MDG, for any signs of contamination after a an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure conducted on a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Keith Moore, 60th Medical Group, uses a device designed to detect radioactive material to scan Maj. (Dr.) Jason Hoskins, 60th MDG, for any signs of contamination after a an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure conducted on a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

News Search