HomeNewsDisplay

News Search

David Grant Medical Center tests advanced cancer treatment

U.S. Air Force doctors prepare a high dose of Yttrium-90 radioactive beads during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radio-embolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force doctors prepare a high dose of Yttrium-90 radioactive beads during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radio-embolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Justin Ritzel, 60th Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron, prepares a tray of specialized medical equipment ahead of an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure for a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Josh Mahler)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Justin Ritzel, 60th Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron, prepares a tray of specialized medical equipment ahead of an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure for a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Josh Mahler)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Christopher Moore, 60th Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron, prepares a tray of specialized medical equipment ahead of an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure for a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Christopher Moore, 60th Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron, prepares a tray of specialized medical equipment ahead of an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure for a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) David Gover and Maj. (Dr.) Jason Hoskins, 60th Medical Group interventional radiologists at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center conduct an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure for a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) David Gover and Maj. (Dr.) Jason Hoskins, 60th Medical Group interventional radiologists at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center conduct an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure for a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) David Gover and Maj. (Dr.) Jason Hoskins, 60th Medical Group interventional radiologists at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center conduct an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure on a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (Photo altered for security reasons) (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) David Gover and Maj. (Dr.) Jason Hoskins, 60th Medical Group interventional radiologists at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center conduct an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure on a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (Photo altered for security reasons) (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force doctors prepare a high dose of Yttrium-90 radioactive beads during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force doctors prepare a high dose of Yttrium-90 radioactive beads during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

Devices designed to detect radioactive material were used during an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure to ensure the safety for medical personnel during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

Devices designed to detect radioactive material were used during an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure to ensure the safety for medical personnel during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

Devices designed to detect radioactive material were used during an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure to ensure the safety for medical personnel during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

Devices designed to detect radioactive material were used during an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure to ensure the safety for medical personnel during a procedure at David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical center, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized to treat cancer by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Keith Moore, 60th Medical Group, uses a device designed to detect radioactive material to scan Maj. (Dr.) Jason Hoskins, 60th MDG, for any signs of contamination after a an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure conducted on a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Keith Moore, 60th Medical Group, uses a device designed to detect radioactive material to scan Maj. (Dr.) Jason Hoskins, 60th MDG, for any signs of contamination after a an Yttrium-90 radioembolization procedure conducted on a patient with liver cancer, Sept. 7, 2018, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Y-90 radioembolization is an advanced and minimally invasive method utilized for this disease by delivering millions of tiny radioactive beads inside the blood vessels that feed a tumor. The high dose of targeted radiation prospectively kills the tumor while sparing normal tissue. This was the first time the treatment was performed at DGMC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

Air Force Medicine

Engage

Facebook Twitter
RT @AirForceReserve: Happy #BillOfRightsDay! This day was designated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on December 15, 1941. The first 1…
Airmen from the 455th Expeditionary Medical Group currently deployed to Bagram Airfield Afghanistan, want to wish e… https://t.co/FZkS5NntJq
Readiness remains our number 1 priority as the AFMS continues to reshape and modernize our medical force to meet th… https://t.co/fzIQcWq0Or
#DYK Medical personnel play a role in every space launch? For the most recent #SpaceX Spaceflight SSO-A: SmallSat E… https://t.co/9Lc0LcOuIv
After you quit smoking, your body goes through incredible changes which significantly impact your health and wellne… https://t.co/0PXGWHaZEP
Dental techs from the 386th Expeditionary Wing dental team had the rare opportunity to perform a dental cleaning on… https://t.co/fjr2YLYHeG
#TBT: At a medical Red Flag exercise, a civilian briefs Air Force and Marine Corps officers on a mobile hospital’s… https://t.co/9kQWf1M5I2
The frontline in modern warfare involves intelligence, surveillance & reconnaissance (ISR), which presents unique s… https://t.co/21kXBFU2l0
In the wake of #HurricaneMichael, Airmen were eager to begin the rebuilding process at Tyndall Air Force Base, Flor… https://t.co/AKNzJ4ixNl
#DYK you are still at risk of dehydration when participating in cold-weather activities? Dr. Love reminisces about… https://t.co/dGuPtSgyX7
The AFMS strengthens public health capabilities of partner nations, & improves interoperability through Global Heal… https://t.co/gI4AJK0PkC
"I don’t care how severe my injury is, I want to be worldwide qualified as soon as I possibly can," said SMSgt. Dav… https://t.co/ICNRFWQIIi
RT @usairforce: #USAF medics from the 51st Medical Group joined the Center for the Sustainment of Trauma & Readiness Skills medical directo…
If you missed TRICARE Open Season, you still have time to enroll! For this year only, you can enroll in or change y… https://t.co/xS4iY14SEV
U.S. Air Force pararescuemen with the 79th Rescue Squadron aboard an HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter rescued a civilian… https://t.co/wRus1dQECB
In case you missed it, one of our top articles this year highlighted Col. (Dr.) Yvonne Cagle, a Flight Surgeon turn… https://t.co/F9FOAsXOmW
SSgt Andrew Dailey modernized the USAFSAM learning experience via a new online & blended learning management system… https://t.co/Q6M6MBKRZg
Monday is the last day to enroll in a new TRICARE plan or change your current plan. The choice you make will take e… https://t.co/QReSEB71xd
In a deployed setting, mental health providers assist commanders with maintaining their Airmen’s overall health in… https://t.co/fkowyMEwlP
Only one week left to enroll in the 2019 TRICARE and Federal Benefits Open Seasons - don't delay! For more informat… https://t.co/4MwUSbAOpL