AFMS Heritage

AFMS Heritage

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U.S. Army Air Forces nurses make their way down the ramp of their Landing Craft Infantry amphibious assault ship on the Mediterranean island of Pantelleria, Italy in 1943. The 34th Station Hospital on the island became the first Army Air Forces hospital truly attached to an Army Air Forces unit. (National Archives) This Month in AFMS History: First attached Army Air Forces unit hospital established 75 years ago
The 34th Station Hospital, attached to the 12th Air Force on Pantelleria Island in the Mediterranean Sea from June 18 to Sept. 21, 1943, was the first station hospital attached to an Army Air Force Unit.
0 6/08
2018
Lt. Gen. Mark Ediger, U.S. Air Force Surgeon General, photographed in his office at the Pentagon, July 8, 2016. Ediger retires from the Air Force, June 1, 2018. (U.S. Air Force photo by J.M. Eddins Jr.) Retiring Surgeon General saw revolution in expeditionary care
Air Force Medicine has changed significantly since 1986, when Lt. Gen. Mark Ediger left his family medicine practice in Missouri to join the Air Force. Ediger, the U.S. Air Force Surgeon General, retires June 1, after a 32-year career that took him around the world, through numerous postings and varied roles. Although Ediger rose to the highest position in Air Force Medicine, he says that was not his intended career path.
0 5/22
2018
General Hoyt S. Vandenberg, Chief of Staff, U.S. Air Force, congratulates chief of the Air Force Nurse Corps, Lt. Col. Verena Zeller (center), and chief of the Air Force Women’s Medical Specialists, Lt. Col. Miriam Perry (right), upon their promotion. (Courtesy photo) First Chief of the Nurse Corps
Verena M. Zeller, the first chief of the Air Force Nurse Corps, was promoted to lieutenant colonel in April 1950. Zeller led the Nurse Corps during the Korean War, overseeing its growth and evolution into an organization focused on flight care.
0 5/09
2018
Aero Medical Laboratory, Medical Research Laboratory, Hazelhurst Field, N.Y (Courtesy photo) This Month in AFMS History: 100th anniversary of first flight surgeon school
On May 8, 1918, U.S. Army Aviation Branch, Col. Theodore Lyster created the first ever course for flight surgeons, at the Medical Research Laboratory, Hazelhurst Field, N.Y.
0 5/08
2018
Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) Day is a time to honor members and reflect on the long-lasting partnership between ANZAC and the Air Force Medical Service, which reaches back to the Korean war when ANZAC and AFMS members worked together as allies. Pictured above, Australian flight nurse Nathalie Oldham, on temporary duty with the U.S. Air Force Medical Service, checks on her American patients before departing Korea for American hospitals in Japan. Oldham, with the Royal Australian Air Force Nursing Service, served with the AFMS for several months during the summer of 1952. During that time she observed many differences between the services, such as, unlike American flight nurses, the Australians did not receive flight pay and were not allowed to eat in the officer's mess. Oldham was also impressed with the Americans' larger medical aircraft and abundance of supplies. (U.S. Air Force photo) ANZAC Day: A time for honoring partnerships
Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) Day is a time to honor members and reflect on the
0 4/25
2018
Flight nurse Lt. Mae Olson takes the name of a wounded American soldier being placed aboard a C-47 for air evacuation from Guadalcanal in 1943. Due to such factors as noise, vibration, and the risk of hypoxia, only very stable patients were able to be transported at this time. (U.S. Air Force photo) The evolution of aeromedical evacuation capabilities help deployed medicine take flight
Evacuating patients injured in combat and transporting them to higher levels of care requires a team of trained medics with the capability to keep patients stable in-flight. The Air Force’s Aeromedical Evacuation system has been a staple of transporting wartime casualties since World War II.
0 3/15
2018
B-17 Flying Fortress radio operator Sgt. James Bothwell, smiles as he displays the back of the flak jacket that saved his life over Germany. He sustained only minor injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo) This Month in AFMS History: 75th Anniversary of the first body armor suits delivered to Eighth Air Force
During World War II, small fragments of high-explosive shells traveling at relatively low velocities caused the majority of bomber air and ground crew casualties.
0 3/07
2018
The C-9A Nightingale made its debut in 1968, landing at Scott Air Force Base, Ill. Created to be a dedicated aeromedical evacuation aircraft, the C-9A was equipped with advanced medical capabilities and faster speeds, which made it an effective addition to the U.S. Air Force’s aeromedical evacuation system. (U.S. Air Force photo) The “Cadillac of medevac”: The C9A’s lasting mark on the aeromedical evacuation system
Making its debut in August of 1968, the C-9A was the U.S. Air Force’s first specially designed aeromedical evacuation aircraft. The C-9A answered the increased demand for effective aeromedical patient transport as U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War escalated.
0 3/07
2018
1st Lt. Aleda E. Lutz USAFSAM training allows others to follow in footsteps of legendary WWII flight nurse
One of the most celebrated flight nurses of World War II, 1st Lt. Aleda E. Lutz flew 196 missions and evacuated more than 3,500 soldiers.
0 2/26
2018
Astronaut Yvonne D. Cagle, a retired U.S. Air Force flight surgeon. (Photo courtesy of U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration) From Flight Surgeon to Astronaut: Air Force Colonel (Dr.) Yvonne Cagle
As a U.S. Air Force flight surgeon, Col. Yvonne Darlene Cagle wanted to fly even higher and fast. She had always wanted to leave her footprints in moon dust, a dream held since seeing Neil Armstrong do it on July 20, 1969. Twenty-seven years after Armstrong’s historic steps, Cagle herself became an astronaut.
0 2/22
2018
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