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Airmen with the 36th Medical Group Mental Health Clinic stand ready to help service members who need assistance in various life circumstances. While many service members may hold misperceptions about mental health care, clinic professionals serve to support Airmen and improve quality of life and performance through comprehensive counseling and guidance programs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexander W. Riedel/Released) Mental health team provides care with Airmen in mind
Life can be stressful.In addition to everyday life, dealing with frequent temporary duty trips, ever-lurking deployments and permanent reassignments from one end of the globe to the next can be both physically and mentally taxing for service members.Often separated from family and social support systems, Airmen encounter various stressors
0 4/02
2018
ADAPT saved my life ADAPT saved my life
Staff Sgt. Brandon was in bad shape. He drank every day and had withdrawals while at work. He looked for reasons to justify why he earned that drink at the end of the day. Brandon is a recovering alcoholic.
0 3/23
2018
A participant in the 374th Force Support Squadron Outdoor Recreation trip to Myoko-Suginohara ski resort looks over forested terrain Feb. 11, 2017, in the Niigata prefecture, Japan. Skiing and snowboarding trips from Outdoor Recreation range from one to multiple days and may include lessons from qualified skiers and snowboarders. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson) The relentless winter poses risk for head injuries
Whether skiing down slopes or walking on an icy sidewalk, winter sports and weather conditions can pose a higher risk for a traumatic brain injury. Especially with the late-winter (now early-spring) onslaught, Military Health System experts are encouraging people to be cautious of surroundings and take steps to protect themselves from these injuries that are often preventable.
0 3/22
2018
Care manager Non-medical care managers dedicated to helping wounded warriors, their caregivers and families
Non-medical care managers serve as the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program’s subject-matter experts and actively advocate for more than 3,000 wounded, ill and injured service men and women.
0 3/22
2018
Pain medications can be dangerous opioids The dangers of opioid pain medications
Pain is the most common reason people seek medical treatment. According to the National Institutes of Health, more than 1 in 10 Americans have chronic pain or pain every day for the preceding three months.
0 3/21
2018
Individual stretching resistance band Physical therapist strengthens EOD mission readiness
Every job in the U.S. Air Force plays a specific role in making sure the mission is accomplished, but for some Airmen, their career fields can physically demand more from their bodies.
0 3/16
2018
Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) can be difficult to detect with its typical lack of physical markers. Knowing the signs and symptoms of TBI is critical and ensures Airmen can return to duty. (U.S. Air Force photo) Clinic answers call for invisible wound care
In the midst of brain injury awareness month, construction of a facility to treat traumatic brain injury is well underway at the 96th Medical Group.
0 3/14
2018
Elaine Davis, a registered dietician at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, is preparing for a tele-medical nutrition therapy appointment with a patient at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska on Feb. 6, 2018. Using a video teleconference, patients have access to dieticians anywhere, and can get vital information in disease management and preventative care. (U.S. Air Force photo) Nutrition care easily accessible via telehealth appointments
The U.S. Air Force Medical Service is working to increase access to high level nutrition care using tele-medical nutrition therapy.
0 3/05
2018
The 47th Medical Group mental health flight accomplishes the goals of caring for Laughlin Airmen so they are able to remain mission-ready and deployment-capable, and caring for their families. Mental health is one of the four pillars of comprehensive airman fitness, along with physical, social and spiritual fitness, and a critical component to a person’s well-being. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Anne McCready) Mental health: Stronger minds, stronger mission
The mental health flight might be a unit hidden in the far corner of Laughlin’s medical group, however, this small unit of Airmen work tirelessly to ensure pilots remain in flight status, the first responders remain able to safeguard the base, and even work with active duty members’ families and civilian employees to rest-assured the mission goes on.
0 3/01
2018
Deep talk Mental health flight trains brains
Whether patients are coming in for help while going through difficult times, feeling down or thinking of suicide, the mental health flight is always ready to help.
0 2/26
2018
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