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Tech. Sgt. Jennifer Garrison, 28th Medical Operations Squadron noncommissioned officer in charge of the mental health clinic, separates blocks for a team building exercise with the human performance team at Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., May 9, 2018. The chapel and mental health clinic went out in human performance teams to connect with Airmen and provide information on the different ways to improve their mental resiliency. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Nicolas Z. Erwin) Breaking down the image: Mental health
Life in the military can be stressful for anyone from a pipeline Airman to a general officer. Fortunately, the 28th Medical Group Mental Health Clinic provides services for Airmen in need.
0 5/21
2018
Members of the 86th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron worked hand in hand with Hellenic service members to improve on joint aeromedical evacuation operations during exercise Stolen Cerberus V. 86th AES exercises joint aeromedical evacuations
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Rachel Wilson (center), 86th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron aeromedical evacuation technician, instructs Hellenic service members on the procedure of lifting a patient during an exercise Stolen Cerberus V training mission at Elefsis Air Base, Greece, May 9, 2018. Exercises such as these improve joint aeromedical
0 5/18
2018
. Davis-Monthan named top base in the Air Force
The Office of the Secretary of Defense named Davis-Monthan the top base in the Air Force for the second time in six years. The base won the 2018 Commander-in-Chief's Installation Excellence Award, which recognizes the outstanding and innovative efforts of the service members who operate and maintain U.S. military installations. Davis-Monthan last won the award in 2012.
0 5/18
2018
Default Air Force Logo Embedded care teams work to improve Airman resiliency
For Airmen at the 363rd Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing, stress is an occupational hazard. Pressing deadlines, a heavy workload and constant pressure are requirements of the mission.They are also one of a growing number of units combating those stressors with an embedded care initiative, known as an Airman Resiliency Team, which fully integrates medical and spiritual support teams into the unit.
0 5/16
2018
The Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment program ensures Airmen are aware of the limitations and consequences of alcohol abuse and its impact on their Air Force career. At each installation, the ADAPT program offers awareness outreach, assessment, and counseling. (U.S. Air Force photo by Samuel King Jr.) Alcohol’s insidious nature: Getting help empowers your career
Alcohol abuse has a deceptively gradual onset that can slowly affect family, friends and work. Knowing the signs and getting help early are key to beating alcohol abuse.
0 5/16
2018
Capt. Daniel Gibson, 92nd Medical Operation Squadron psychologist, goes over the Nexxus Biotrace with Staff Sgt. Donald Durst, 92nd Aerospace Medicine Squadron aerospace medical technician, May 4, 2018 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash. The program allows patients to see how their body is responding to both physical and mental stress. The patient is able to visualize what his or her body is doing under stress and see how it differs when in a relaxed state. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Samantha Krolikowski) A day in the life: Mental health supports Airmen, readiness
As with any Air Force healthcare provider, Capt. Daniel Gibson, a clinical psychologist with the 92nd medical group, Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, relies on a collaborative, patient-centered approach to care.The mental health clinic at Fairchild Air Force Base uses a collaborative approach to ensure the best patient care.
0 5/16
2018
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Matthew Helmich, a finance technician assigned to the 509th Comptroller Squadron, in-processes Lt. Col. Rachel Freestrom, the 509th Communications Squadron incoming commander, at the Whiteman Welcome Center at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., May 7, 2018. The center, which is part of the Task Force True North resiliency program, acts as the one-stop shop for in-processing newcomers to the base. Active duty members and government civilian employees are being surveyed through May 18 about behavioral health within their units and families in an effort to enhance resources available to them. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor Phifer) True North program helps Airmen
The newly opened Whiteman Welcome Center serves as a one-stop shop for in-processing appointments, including administrative, financial and medical needs. Freestrom and other new arrivals receive a list required appointments from the center’s staff.
0 5/15
2018
Default Air Force Logo Check your ego at the door, be your own advocate
Master Sgt. James Stalnaker always thought going to mental health was a deal breaker for your career; that mental issues make you a weaker person. It took encountering struggles of his own to change those views.
0 5/15
2018
Nurse Manny Santiago (right) with retired Marine Corps Sgt. Carlos Evans in October at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Santiago said he “had the privilege of taking care of this young man” after Evans stepped on an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan in May 2010 during his fourth combat deployment. The two men discovered they’re both from the same hometown in Puerto Rico. (Courtesy photo) Best job in military health? For these men, it’s nursing
Women dominate the nursing profession, but retired Navy Lt. Cmdr. Manny Santiago is quick to point out some historical exceptions.
0 5/14
2018
Air Force then-Capt. Cade Reedy, a critical care nurse, donates blood during a Special Operations Surgical Team deployment to save the life of a local man severely wounded while fighting enemy forces. (U.S. Air Force photo) For many nurses, saving lives means risking their own
Nurses in the Military Health System understand that providing care may mean risking their own lives. On July 10, 2007, Army Capt. Maria Ortiz died in Iraq, marking the first time since the Vietnam War a military nurse had been killed in combat.
0 5/14
2018
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