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Health Promotions Newsletter: Jan-Mar 2017

News & Events

Wright-Patterson Clinic MTF News

News Comments Updated
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The symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can often be debilitating, significantly affecting a patient’s quality of life. Air Force mental health professionals have successfully treated many Airmen with the use of prolonged exposure therapy. Through this collaborative therapy, the patient is safely and gradually exposed to trauma-related memories and situations that have been avoided. The eventual goal is to alter the patient’s relationship with and reaction to the traumatic event so it no longer affects their quality of life and ability to do their job. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Josh Mahler) A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD
Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty. One of the most effective therapies, practiced by many Air Force mental health professionals, is prolonged exposure therapy.
0 7/03
2018
Maj. Shane Runyon (right), Baltimore’s Center for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills (C-STARS) program deputy director, and Master Sgt. Sean Patterson, a respiratory therapist and superintendent of C-STARS Baltimore, set up for patient arrival at the Trauma Resuscitation Unit (TRU) at the University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, June 13, 2018. The U.S. Air Force’s C-STARS Baltimore program partners with the R Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center to ensure medical Airmen train on the latest trauma care techniques. These techniques prepare medical Airmen to treat trauma patients in a deployed setting. (Courtesy photo) Baltimore C-STARS partnership prepares Airmen for battlefield medicine
Civilian partnerships are a vital readiness resource for the Air Force Medical Service, refreshing medics on trauma skills and taking lessons learned to deliver life-saving trauma care downrange. The Center for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills program in Baltimore, Maryland, prepares medical Airmen for deployment through immersive training at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center.
0 7/03
2018
Brig. Gen. (ret) Eugen Reinartz USAFSAM’s centennial celebration still going strong
WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio -- Mid-way through its centennial year, the United States Air
0 6/28
2018
Many Airman are unaware what the initial meeting with a mental health provider looks like when they seek PTSD treatment. The goal of the first meeting is to make the patient feel comfortable and to be as transparent as possible about what is going on and what treatment options the patient has. As a result, the patient and mental health provider will more likely have a collaborative and trusting interaction, making PTSD treatment more successful. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Josh Mahler) A peek behind the curtain: The first step of PTSD care
Perhaps the most difficult part of seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder is making that first appointment, since Airmen are often unsure of what to expect. Not knowing what to expect from mental health providers can get in the way of effective PTSD treatment.
0 6/26
2018
Capt. Marina Boles, Health Services Administration Medical Readiness Management course instructor, Joint Base San Antonio, Fort Sam Houston, conducts a training session during the second pilot of the Basic Leader Airman Skills Training course, held at the United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio May 24, 2018. USAFSAM brings BLAST live to train leaders
WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio – The United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine
0 6/25
2018
Those that suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are consistently trying to regain some sense of the normalcy they had before events that caused pieces of themselves to go missing. Misconceptions and stigmas surrounding PTSD get in the way of successful recovery and the ability to return to duty. (U.S. Air Force illustration by Master Sgt. William Vance) A peek behind the curtain: PTSD barriers and stigmas
Effective treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder is possible, but many Airmen falsely think seeking medical help for PTSD will hurt their career and will not help them get better. These stigmas and misconceptions create perceived barriers, preventing Airmen from seeking care. Delaying treatment can cause the anxiety and fear following a traumatic event to affect an Airman’s readiness.
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2018
C-STARS training C-STARS visit highlights trauma training
Assessing and treating critically injured warfighters is no easy task for Air Force medics with two feet firmly planted on the ground. At 35,000 feet in the air, the ability to provide care is even more of a challenge, requiring in-depth, realistic training and readiness for medic team success. The C-STARS is a joint partnership between the University of Cincinnati Medical Center and the Air Force, with the mission to provide hands-on, realistic training for military medical personnel in trauma and critical care. One of three C-STARS training platforms in the U.S., the Cincinnati C-STARS trains more than 250 military critical care air transport teams (CCATTs) annually, evaluating and certifying that casualty care teams are capable and ready to provide emergency treatment to seriously injured patients at point of injury so they can be transported to military treatment facilities for further care.
0 6/18
2018
2017 Drinking Water Confidence Report Released 2017 Drinking Water Confidence Report Released
WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio – The Bioenvironmental Engineering Office at Wright-Patterson
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2018
Capt. Andrea Krunnfusz (left) and Capt. Milagros Gargurevich (right), teaching a Playing Big session at the Airman and Family Readiness Center. It’s time to start playing big
WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio — We’re all familiar with self-doubt. It’s that pesky inner
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2018
Lt. Gen. Mark Ediger, U.S. Air Force Surgeon General, photographed in his office at the Pentagon, July 8, 2016. Ediger retires from the Air Force, June 1, 2018. (U.S. Air Force photo by J.M. Eddins Jr.) Retiring Surgeon General saw revolution in expeditionary care
Air Force Medicine has changed significantly since 1986, when Lt. Gen. Mark Ediger left his family medicine practice in Missouri to join the Air Force. Ediger, the U.S. Air Force Surgeon General, retires June 1, after a 32-year career that took him around the world, through numerous postings and varied roles. Although Ediger rose to the highest position in Air Force Medicine, he says that was not his intended career path.
0 5/22
2018
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